Why I’m Moving Away From the City I Love

  1. Cost of rent here is stupid high. Why keep making other people rich?
  2. My daughter is still in school and I want to help her complete her education.
  3. Parking is ridiculous. I never go anywhere anymore because I dread having to find somewhere to park, and then when I do park I worry whether my car will be broken into or damaged by someone who uses it to help them get into a parking space.
  4. I’m always cold here. Even in my house. Last December it was so cold in my living room I could see my breath. Turn on the heat, you say? Unbeknownst to me my landlord had commingled my gas and electric lines with those of the illegal in-law he built downstairs and so for almost eight years I was paying their bill in addition to mine. No wonder my bills were so high. Since confronted about it two months ago, my landlord had the lines separated and my bill has gone down 30.00 per month. So that’s good, but besides that, it’s cold and windy ten months of the year in this neighborhood and I cannot afford to move to the Mission, where it’s warmer.
  5. Our downstairs neighbors suck. They are loud (waking us up most mornings), entitled, inconsiderate, and rude. Also, patholological liars, for some reason. We’ve tried to make peace with them but it is not happening. Some people are just not happy.
  6. Earthquakes. I know, we act all brave and whatnot, but how many of you lived through the Loma Prieta quake? I lived in the Marina District when it happened and after having seen the deaths and horrors of the Cypress Structure in Oakland and in my own neighborhood, I still have PTSD from it. I am not speaking of PTSD metaphorically, either. Whenever there is the slightest shaking, I am instantly overwhelmed by fear and sadness and I begin crying immediately. I even begin reacting this way when a big truck rumbles by. When I go to bed at night, one of my last thoughts is fear that a quake will hit while I’m sleeping. It’s bad. I won’t miss that feeling at all.
  7. The rent for a small house in the gorgeous countryside of the southwest of France is $800.00 per month, including all utilities and internet. You read that right. If I decide I want to move to Paris, it’s about $2,000.00 per month for a really nice two bedroom in one of the best arrondisements. I will live in the country to save money so I can buy a small house and never be evicted again. A small house in Sarlat-la-Caneda, a gorgeous medieval town, runs about $72,000.00. After two years renting in the countryside, what I save by not renting in San Francisco will pay cash for a little house in the French countryside. CASH.
  8. I’ll be able to improve my French, which is a goal.
  9. I’ll have time to paint and write, two of my favorite things to do, because I won’t have to spend all my time worrying about making enough money to pay my bills. Proximity to Paris (four and a half hours by train) means I can study the paintings at the Louvre over a weekend. Being in France also means I could pop over to Italy, Spain, The Netherlands, just for a weekend to study at their museums.
  10. Since people in France spend an average of 19% of their income on housing, they don’t have to work all the time and so have the mental space and time to spend with their friends. This lifestyle of getting together with friends after work every day is very civilized. If friendships lead to happiness, it’s no wonder the French seem happier than we are.
  11. The Trump administration is an embarrassment and a disgrace to the ideals of my beloved country. I just can’t anymore.

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